A Monochrome a day …

Monochrome:

mon·o·chrome  mänəˌkrōm
noun: monochrome; plural noun: monochromes
A photograph or picture developed or executed in black and white or in varying tones of only one color.

I’ve been a life long analog (film) shooter. Ninety percent of the film I shoot is black and white. I’ve always enjoyed and appreciated shooting in black and white. There is something about seeing an image and visualizing it in bw. Since moving to shooting digital, I’ve lost some of that sense of visualizing the image in bw. I never lost it but shooting so much in digital (color) it was not part of my daily routine. It’s been about 3-4 years now that I’ve seriously gotten back into shooting bw film.

I’ve had several personal year long projects the last few years where I shoot with my collection of analog cameras with film. In my collection I have many 35mm, several medium format, 2 4×5 Graflex’s and a 5×7 1908 Seneca camera. I won’t go very far without an analog camera.

What I’m doing is not a new thing I know, but I recently combined my love of shooting in bw with my daily routine of shooting with a digital camera. Each and every day I intentionally look for an image to shoot in monochrome, I go into the menu setting on my camera, Photo Shooting Menu, Set Picture Control, MC Monochrome and create the image.

I’ve been hesitant to announce or post this blog, but I’ve been shooting nearly three months straight & I’ve been getting some fun shots. Most of my posts will be on Instagram & Twitter, it’s a little easier BUT here are a few images …

 

Please let me know your comments on my newest project A Monochrome a day.

Tomlinson Wedding – Sneak Peek

I had such an enjoyable time documenting Luke & Kaity’s wedding. It was evident of their love for each other! Their friends and family were so supportive of the two of them committing their lives together in marriage. Thank you Luke & Kaity for allowing me to be a part of your wedding day.

The Making of a Polaroid Image Transfer

Scott Huck's Blog

I’ve been making (creating) Polaroid Image Transfers for YEARS. Creating a transfer never gets old, it is fun every time. The idea of a Polaroid transfer is interrupting the process of a Polaroid peel apart image and transferring the image from the negative to another substrate. Through trial & error over the years, I’ve found that these steps below will give me successful transfers over and over. I like using a smoother substrate (watercolor paper) than one that is course, the image transfers much easier onto a smooth substrate. One of my first Polaroid Image Transfers.

I have an upcoming blog post explaining the Polaroid film (Type 88 / square) that I used to create this transfer.

The Polaroid Square Shooter 2 with Polaroid Polacolor Type 88 expired film, Oct. 2005. The Polaroid Square Shooter 2 with Polaroid Polacolor Type 88 expired film, Oct. 2005.

Pull the image from the Polaroid camera. Pull the image from the Polaroid camera.

Cut to eliminate excess paper on the edge. Cut to eliminate excess paper on the edge.

It helps to cut the extra paper off along the edge of the Polaroid image. It helps to…

View original post 252 more words

End of an era …

On Tuesday, many missed out on the last Symphonic Band and Brass Choir concert for Professors Pagnard and DiCuirci at Cedarville as they presented their end of the semester concert.  It was a great concert & fun to document an end of an era.

ND4_8384ND4_8408ND4_8510ND4_8578

Yashica Electro 35 GT – review

Yashica Electro 35 GT

I can’t believe the month of shooting with this rangefinder has come to an end.  It was a fun month of shooting, easy, but fun since the GT is an aperture priority camera.  I’m a big fan of shooting with minimum depth of field but typically with a 35mm SLR camera not a rangefinder.  It was a little harder shooting (trusting my focus) at f/1.7 or f/2 with the Yashica rangefinder.  I put 3 rolls of film through the GT this month, 36exp, 24exp & 32exp.  The first roll was Arista EDU Ultra 400 36exp.  The second roll was an old roll of Kodak 400 24exp and The last roll was bulk rolled Arista EDU Ultra 400, that’s why it was only 32 exposures.

The Yashica Electro 35 GT was released in 1969 with a full black body paint instead of the satin chrome finish like the other Yashica Electro 35’s in the series.
At the time of this post, I have not processed any of the film I shot. I will follow up with a selection of images from each of the 3 rolls.

Yashica Electro 35 GT 1

Clean travel case with strap.

Yashica Electro 35 GT 2

Yashica Electro 35 GT 5

ISO/ASA selector slow & over shutter speed indicator shutter lock

Yashica Electro 35 GT 4

Yashinon-DX 45mm lens f1.7 – f/16 with minimum focus distance at 2.6 ft

Yashica Electro 35 GT 3

Aperture priority f/1.7 – f/16 mechanical self-timer

Yashica Electro 35 GT 7

Battery Check indicator (5.6 volt, currently using a DIY built battery)

Yashica Electro 35 GT 6

Film wind up real  & hot shoe

As a reminder … #12cameras12months is the project I’m currently working on where I I’ve selected 12 cameras from my collection and I shoot with 1 camera every day for a month. I’ve not done so well with my reviews or follow ups … but I have been consistent in shooting every day with my cameras in the project. It has been fun & challenging … shooting with film is always fun! I’m super excited to announce the camera I’ll be shooting in April. April will be fun! Check my Instagram for the reveal!