Yashica Electro 35 GT – review

Yashica Electro 35 GT

I can’t believe the month of shooting with this rangefinder has come to an end.  It was a fun month of shooting, easy, but fun since the GT is an aperture priority camera.  I’m a big fan of shooting with minimum depth of field but typically with a 35mm SLR camera not a rangefinder.  It was a little harder shooting (trusting my focus) at f/1.7 or f/2 with the Yashica rangefinder.  I put 3 rolls of film through the GT this month, 36exp, 24exp & 32exp.  The first roll was Arista EDU Ultra 400 36exp.  The second roll was an old roll of Kodak 400 24exp and The last roll was bulk rolled Arista EDU Ultra 400, that’s why it was only 32 exposures.

The Yashica Electro 35 GT was released in 1969 with a full black body paint instead of the satin chrome finish like the other Yashica Electro 35’s in the series.
At the time of this post, I have not processed any of the film I shot. I will follow up with a selection of images from each of the 3 rolls.

Yashica Electro 35 GT 1

Clean travel case with strap.

Yashica Electro 35 GT 2

Yashica Electro 35 GT 5

ISO/ASA selector slow & over shutter speed indicator shutter lock

Yashica Electro 35 GT 4

Yashinon-DX 45mm lens f1.7 – f/16 with minimum focus distance at 2.6 ft

Yashica Electro 35 GT 3

Aperture priority f/1.7 – f/16 mechanical self-timer

Yashica Electro 35 GT 7

Battery Check indicator (5.6 volt, currently using a DIY built battery)

Yashica Electro 35 GT 6

Film wind up real  & hot shoe

As a reminder … #12cameras12months is the project I’m currently working on where I I’ve selected 12 cameras from my collection and I shoot with 1 camera every day for a month. I’ve not done so well with my reviews or follow ups … but I have been consistent in shooting every day with my cameras in the project. It has been fun & challenging … shooting with film is always fun! I’m super excited to announce the camera I’ll be shooting in April. April will be fun! Check my Instagram for the reveal!

February / Yashica D – 12 Months 12 Cameras

The Yashica D is a medium square (2 ¼ x 2 ¼) format, film TLR (twin lens Reflex) camera manufactured in the 1970’s. I don’t want to bore you with the details & the in’s & out’s of the camera. A great source to find details about the camera is: http://camerapedia.wikia.com/wiki/Yashica-D & you check out a Yashica D manual here: http://www.cameramanuals.org/yashica_pdf/yashica_d.pdf

It’s been a fun month shooting with the Yashica D. I shot 3 rolls of film but have yet to process any of the rolls from this month. The camera & leather case is in excellent condition! The camera is fairly easy to use if you know your way around a camera but there is a little learning curve on a TLR. I don’t shoot with TLR’s regularly so the first thing I had to remember every time I wanted to take a picture was to advance the film or else I would double expose the image … and that happened a few times at the beginning.

You cannot be in a hurry when taking pictures with a Yashica TLR because you have to focus through the waist level finder and the image is inverted, so that takes some getting used to. There is not a meter in the Yashica D, so I had two methods of metering, one was to use the meter APP on my iPhone or two, take a picture on my Nikon D4 and transfer the shutter speed and aperture on the Yashica.

I very much enjoyed carrying the camera around and finding the one shot I wanted to take each day as part of my 12 cameras 12 months project. This is a camera I will continue to go back to because (even though I have not processed the film from this month) I know this camera gives quality results!

A little Black & White

I’m a huge fan of black & white! WOW, I just thought about how long I’ve been shooting with B&W film and it’s been more than 30 years! Since I’ve embraced shooting digital, I’ve lost some of the skill of shooting in B&W. That makes me sad! I really enjoy(ed) the process of seeing (visualizing) what the image would look like in B&W and then shooting.

This November I’ve had a little project where I change the color mode to monochrome in my DSLR camera and shoot in black & white. It’s been so much fun! It’s been fun again visualizing (seeing) in B&W!

Here is an image I saw and thought would look interesting in black & white.

 
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I’ll post some more soon.

FOUR Polaroid cameras

Four Polaroid cameras “For Sale” on my Etsy site while they last … don’t miss out!

Polaroid Sun660 Autofocus
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Polaroid The Colorpack
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Polaroid Sun600 LMS
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Polaroid Super Shooter
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Join the analog world & get your own Polaroid instant camera.
All the cameras have been tested & work as they should.

The Making of a Polaroid Image Transfer

I’ve been making (creating) Polaroid Image Transfers for YEARS. Creating a transfer never gets old, it is fun every time. The idea of a Polaroid transfer is interrupting the process of a Polaroid peel apart image and transferring the image from the negative to another substrate. Through trial & error over the years, I’ve found that these steps below will give me successful transfers over and over. I like using a smoother substrate (watercolor paper) than one that is course, the image transfers much easier onto a smooth substrate. One of my first Polaroid Image Transfers.

I have an upcoming blog post explaining the Polaroid film (Type 88 / square) that I used to create this transfer.

The Polaroid Square Shooter 2 with Polaroid Polacolor Type 88 expired film, Oct. 2005.

The Polaroid Square Shooter 2 with Polaroid Polacolor Type 88 expired film, Oct. 2005.

 

Pull the image from the Polaroid camera.

Pull the image from the Polaroid camera.

 

Cut to eliminate excess paper on the edge.

Cut to eliminate excess paper on the edge.

 

It helps to cut the extra paper off along the edge of the Polaroid image.

It helps to cut the extra paper off along the edge of the Polaroid image.

 

During the early steps, you want to have watecolor paper submerged into hot water & after pulling the image from the camera take the paper from the water and roll excess water from the paper.

During the early steps, you want to have watercolor paper submerged into hot water & after pulling the image from the camera take the paper from the water and roll excess water from the paper.

 

In roughly 20-25 seconds after pulling the image from the camera, peel the negative & positive apart to stop the process of the positive image.

In roughly 20-25 seconds after pulling the image from the camera, peel the negative & positive apart to stop (or interrupt) the process of the positive image.

 

Quickly place the negative image on the watercolor paper.

Quickly place the negative image on the watercolor paper.

 

Set the image on the paper by lightly rolling using a soft rubber brayer.

Set the image on the paper by lightly rolling using a soft rubber brayer.

 

Place another piece of paper over the negative and gently roll in both directions.

Place another piece of paper over the negative and gently roll in both directions.

 

Use a hot iron and gently heat the paper moving the iron continual motion.

Use a hot iron and gently heat the paper moving the iron continual motion.

 

 

After two minutes or so, slowly and gently take a corner of the negative and peel the negative from the paper.

After two minutes or so, slowly and gently take a corner of the negative and peel the negative from the paper.

 

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This is the most anxious part of the process. As you slowly peel the negative from the paper, the transfer image is revealed.

This is the most anxious part of the process. As you slowly peel the negative from the paper, the transfer image is revealed.

 

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With this expired film, I've noticed on all the transfers have an extra amount of brownish goop. You can move it around a little to reduce the excess goop on the final image.

With this expired film, I’ve noticed on all the transfers have an extra amount of brownish goop. You can move it around a little to reduce the excess goop on the final image.

 

Typically to get a good image, you don't peel apart the negative from the Polaroid image until after 60-90 seconds. Typically to get a good Polaroid image, you don’t peel apart the negative from the positive image until after 60-90 seconds.[/caption]

 

I'm extremely stoked with the results of another successful Polaroid Image Transfer.

I’m extremely stoked with the results of another successful Polaroid Image Transfer.

 

Shout out to Wade McComas for spontaneously documenting these steps while I made the Polaroid Image Transfer.

Rollei B35

I’ve been having a fun time with this little beast of a camera. It is very compact but has all the manual settings and is a sturdy rugged camera. You can change the aperture & shutter on the lens barrel. There is a nice handy light meter on the top of the camera. I’ve not processed any film from the camera but hoping for the best at the moment. If all goes well, since it folds up so compactly, I expect to have this little beast in my camera arsenal all the time.

Rollei B35 with the lens in the closed position.

Rollei B35 with the lens in the closed position.

Rollei B35 with the lens in the open position.

Rollei B35 with the lens in the open position.

Bottom of the Rollei B35 camera with the film winder, tripod mount, film release button & flash shoe.

Bottom of the Rollei B35 camera with the film winder, tripod mount, film release button & flash shoe.

Top of the Rollei B35 camera with the meter, shutter release & counter.

Top of the Rollei B35 camera with the meter, shutter release & counter.

Rollei B35 camera with the rear assembly off.

Rollei B35 camera with the rear assembly off.

Rollei B35 camera with the rear assembly off showing the bottom lock mechanism.

Rollei B35 camera with the rear assembly off showing the bottom lock mechanism.

Big weekend at the Huck house

 

We had a big weekend, Abby graduated from high school on Saturday and we had a graduation open house on Sunday. Roxy’s parents and my parents came in for the festivities.

 

All smiles after Abby's graduation.

All smiles after Abby’s graduation.

 

Gma & Gpa Nolt & Gma & Gpa Huck with Abby after graduation.

Gpa & Gma Nolt and Gma & Gpa Huck with Abby after graduation.

 

I’m really enjoy shooting with my Polaroid 420 camera and I could not pass up shooting a portrait of my parents on the Polaroid camera.

Polaroid portrait of my parents shot with a Polaroid 420 on Fujifilm FP3000b film.

Polaroid portrait of my parents shot with a Polaroid 420 on Fujifilm FP3000b film.