The Making of a Polaroid Image Transfer

I’ve been making (creating) Polaroid Image Transfers for YEARS. Creating a transfer never gets old, it is fun every time. The idea of a Polaroid transfer is interrupting the process of a Polaroid peel apart image and transferring the image from the negative to another substrate. Through trial & error over the years, I’ve found that these steps below will give me successful transfers over and over. I like using a smoother substrate (watercolor paper) than one that is course, the image transfers much easier onto a smooth substrate. One of my first Polaroid Image Transfers.

I have an upcoming blog post explaining the Polaroid film (Type 88 / square) that I used to create this transfer.

The Polaroid Square Shooter 2 with Polaroid Polacolor Type 88 expired film, Oct. 2005.

The Polaroid Square Shooter 2 with Polaroid Polacolor Type 88 expired film, Oct. 2005.

 

Pull the image from the Polaroid camera.

Pull the image from the Polaroid camera.

 

Cut to eliminate excess paper on the edge.

Cut to eliminate excess paper on the edge.

 

It helps to cut the extra paper off along the edge of the Polaroid image.

It helps to cut the extra paper off along the edge of the Polaroid image.

 

During the early steps, you want to have watecolor paper submerged into hot water & after pulling the image from the camera take the paper from the water and roll excess water from the paper.

During the early steps, you want to have watercolor paper submerged into hot water & after pulling the image from the camera take the paper from the water and roll excess water from the paper.

 

In roughly 20-25 seconds after pulling the image from the camera, peel the negative & positive apart to stop the process of the positive image.

In roughly 20-25 seconds after pulling the image from the camera, peel the negative & positive apart to stop (or interrupt) the process of the positive image.

 

Quickly place the negative image on the watercolor paper.

Quickly place the negative image on the watercolor paper.

 

Set the image on the paper by lightly rolling using a soft rubber brayer.

Set the image on the paper by lightly rolling using a soft rubber brayer.

 

Place another piece of paper over the negative and gently roll in both directions.

Place another piece of paper over the negative and gently roll in both directions.

 

Use a hot iron and gently heat the paper moving the iron continual motion.

Use a hot iron and gently heat the paper moving the iron continual motion.

 

 

After two minutes or so, slowly and gently take a corner of the negative and peel the negative from the paper.

After two minutes or so, slowly and gently take a corner of the negative and peel the negative from the paper.

 

DSCF4104

This is the most anxious part of the process. As you slowly peel the negative from the paper, the transfer image is revealed.

This is the most anxious part of the process. As you slowly peel the negative from the paper, the transfer image is revealed.

 

DSCF4108

With this expired film, I've noticed on all the transfers have an extra amount of brownish goop. You can move it around a little to reduce the excess goop on the final image.

With this expired film, I’ve noticed on all the transfers have an extra amount of brownish goop. You can move it around a little to reduce the excess goop on the final image.

 

Typically to get a good image, you don't peel apart the negative from the Polaroid image until after 60-90 seconds. Typically to get a good Polaroid image, you don’t peel apart the negative from the positive image until after 60-90 seconds.[/caption]

 

I'm extremely stoked with the results of another successful Polaroid Image Transfer.

I’m extremely stoked with the results of another successful Polaroid Image Transfer.

 

Shout out to Wade McComas for spontaneously documenting these steps while I made the Polaroid Image Transfer.

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4 responses to “The Making of a Polaroid Image Transfer

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