Geology Sed Strat Spring Break DAY 2

After a short drive from Vernal, Utah where we stayed the night, we stopped at the entrance of Dinosaur National Monument for a group picture.

After a short drive from Vernal, Utah where we stayed the night, we stopped at the entrance of Dinosaur National Monument for a group picture.

The students had an opportunity to observe dinosaur fossils in the cliff face at the Carnegie Quarry, Dr. Whitmore brought the students back together to discuss what they observed and give some possible explanation.

The students had an opportunity to observe dinosaur fossils in the cliff face at the Carnegie Quarry, Dr. Whitmore brought the students back together to discuss what they observed and give some possible explanation.

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A fairly large dinosaur and vertebrae in the quarry exhibit.

A fairly large dinosaur and vertebrae in the quarry exhibit.

After spending the morning at the DNM, we moved on into Colorado. Dr. Whitmore reviews with the students on measuring the thickness of rock formations.

After spending the morning at the DNM, we moved on into Colorado. Dr. Whitmore reviews with the students on measuring the thickness of rock formations.

Dr. Andrew Snelling and Dr. Whitmore still can't escape the grasp of technology miles away from civilization.

Dr. Andrew Snelling and Dr. Whitmore still can’t escape the grasp of technology miles away from civilization.

Students split up into two groups to measure the thickness of the rock layers and describe the lythology.

Students split up into two groups to measure the thickness of the rock layers and describe the lythology.

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Ryan shows Victoria how to sight down a Brunton Compass with a Jacob Staff to measure rock layer thickness.

Ryan shows Victoria how to sight down a Brunton Compass with a Jacob Staff to measure rock layer thickness.

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While traversing the slopes and hills with Dr. Whitmore and students, it was not hard to observe the unique shapes of the cedar trees.

While traversing the slopes and hills with Dr. Whitmore and students, it was not hard to observe the unique shapes of the cedar trees.

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