The Making of a Polaroid Image Transfer

I’ve been making (creating) Polaroid Image Transfers for YEARS. Creating a transfer never gets old, it is fun every time. The idea of a Polaroid transfer is interrupting the process of a Polaroid peel apart image and transferring the image from the negative to another substrate. Through trial & error over the years, I’ve found that these steps below will give me successful transfers over and over. I like using a smoother substrate (watercolor paper) than one that is course, the image transfers much easier onto a smooth substrate. One of my first Polaroid Image Transfers.

I have an upcoming blog post explaining the Polaroid film (Type 88 / square) that I used to create this transfer.

The Polaroid Square Shooter 2 with Polaroid Polacolor Type 88 expired film, Oct. 2005.

The Polaroid Square Shooter 2 with Polaroid Polacolor Type 88 expired film, Oct. 2005.

 

Pull the image from the Polaroid camera.

Pull the image from the Polaroid camera.

 

Cut to eliminate excess paper on the edge.

Cut to eliminate excess paper on the edge.

 

It helps to cut the extra paper off along the edge of the Polaroid image.

It helps to cut the extra paper off along the edge of the Polaroid image.

 

During the early steps, you want to have watecolor paper submerged into hot water & after pulling the image from the camera take the paper from the water and roll excess water from the paper.

During the early steps, you want to have watercolor paper submerged into hot water & after pulling the image from the camera take the paper from the water and roll excess water from the paper.

 

In roughly 20-25 seconds after pulling the image from the camera, peel the negative & positive apart to stop the process of the positive image.

In roughly 20-25 seconds after pulling the image from the camera, peel the negative & positive apart to stop (or interrupt) the process of the positive image.

 

Quickly place the negative image on the watercolor paper.

Quickly place the negative image on the watercolor paper.

 

Set the image on the paper by lightly rolling using a soft rubber brayer.

Set the image on the paper by lightly rolling using a soft rubber brayer.

 

Place another piece of paper over the negative and gently roll in both directions.

Place another piece of paper over the negative and gently roll in both directions.

 

Use a hot iron and gently heat the paper moving the iron continual motion.

Use a hot iron and gently heat the paper moving the iron continual motion.

 

 

After two minutes or so, slowly and gently take a corner of the negative and peel the negative from the paper.

After two minutes or so, slowly and gently take a corner of the negative and peel the negative from the paper.

 

DSCF4104

This is the most anxious part of the process. As you slowly peel the negative from the paper, the transfer image is revealed.

This is the most anxious part of the process. As you slowly peel the negative from the paper, the transfer image is revealed.

 

DSCF4108

With this expired film, I've noticed on all the transfers have an extra amount of brownish goop. You can move it around a little to reduce the excess goop on the final image.

With this expired film, I’ve noticed on all the transfers have an extra amount of brownish goop. You can move it around a little to reduce the excess goop on the final image.

 

Typically to get a good image, you don't peel apart the negative from the Polaroid image until after 60-90 seconds. Typically to get a good Polaroid image, you don’t peel apart the negative from the positive image until after 60-90 seconds.[/caption]

 

I'm extremely stoked with the results of another successful Polaroid Image Transfer.

I’m extremely stoked with the results of another successful Polaroid Image Transfer.

 

Shout out to Wade McComas for spontaneously documenting these steps while I made the Polaroid Image Transfer.

Rollei B35

I’ve been having a fun time with this little beast of a camera. It is very compact but has all the manual settings and is a sturdy rugged camera. You can change the aperture & shutter on the lens barrel. There is a nice handy light meter on the top of the camera. I’ve not processed any film from the camera but hoping for the best at the moment. If all goes well, since it folds up so compactly, I expect to have this little beast in my camera arsenal all the time.

Rollei B35 with the lens in the closed position.

Rollei B35 with the lens in the closed position.

Rollei B35 with the lens in the open position.

Rollei B35 with the lens in the open position.

Bottom of the Rollei B35 camera with the film winder, tripod mount, film release button & flash shoe.

Bottom of the Rollei B35 camera with the film winder, tripod mount, film release button & flash shoe.

Top of the Rollei B35 camera with the meter, shutter release & counter.

Top of the Rollei B35 camera with the meter, shutter release & counter.

Rollei B35 camera with the rear assembly off.

Rollei B35 camera with the rear assembly off.

Rollei B35 camera with the rear assembly off showing the bottom lock mechanism.

Rollei B35 camera with the rear assembly off showing the bottom lock mechanism.

NEW – Impossible B&W 600 Generation 2.0 Beta film

I have a renewed interest in The Impossible Project after shooting the BW 2.0 Beta film. There are only 8 images in the cartridge and you have to be kind of purposeful with what you shoot. Even though there is no need to shade the image from light, I still do. I take the shot and move on … no second chances.

1) My first shot with Ned as the model.

1) My first shot with Ned as the model.

2) This area is outside my office door, I've always liked the detail & lines.

2) This area is outside my office door, I’ve always liked the detail & lines.

3) Dylan is showing off his freshly developed contact sheets.

3) Dylan is showing off his freshly developed contact sheets.

4) Mr. Handy saved the day. They had the part so that I could repair our broken clothes dryer.

4) Mr. Handy saved the day. The had the part so that I could repair our broken clothes dryer.

5) I like this building & thought it would make for a nice Impossible shot.

5) I like this building & thought it would make for a nice Impossible shot.

6) Ned again ...

6) Ned again …

7) A bunch of orange flowers look interesting in BW.

7) A bunch of orange flowers look interesting in BW.

8) Tall pines along the side of the parking lot.

8) Tall pines along the side of the parking lot.

Joellyn & Ben … their big day / A Sneak Peek!

I’m super excited to share with you a sneak peek of Joellyn & Ben’s wedding. The Simon Kenton Inn made for a beautiful wedding location. Thank you Joellyn & Ben for entrusting me to document your special day!

Annie & Travis … their big day / A Sneak Peek!

I’m excited to share with you a sneak peek of Annie & Travis’s wedding. It was a wonderful day. Thank you Annie & Travis for allowing me to document your special day!

Camp Electric … so far!

I have to be honest, I always look forward to the middle of July at Cedarville when Camp Electric comes to campus. I’ve always been a huge fan of CCM and for me, there’s no better way to experience a concert than through the lens of a camera. I missed the Sunday & Monday evening CE concerts but I made it to the afternoon sessions & Tuesday evening concert with City Harbor & Royal Tailor.

Don’t think that Camp Electric is over …

TobyMac will be bringing it live Wednesday evening, and he always gives a great concert. Check back for concert pics from TobyMac & KJ52.